What The???

What is What The???   Well in Australia we had a TV show compared by a gentleman called Rove McManus and on his show he had a section called What The?

It was a bit of a hodge podge but the general theme was the items that appeared made you do the quick double take and query What The????

With Cee discontinuing OddBall I thought I would start something based on Rove’s concept.  So my What The??? will be anything I locate which makes me scratch my head in confusion – news stories, photos even strange adverts.

Feel free to join in if your interested.

Deb

This week on What The??? I have a bad one – the contamination of Australian strawberries.  Last week it was discovered that persons unknown had contaminated strawberries by putting sewing needles in them, therefore risking people’s lives.  In my opinion this is diabolical, the culprit is an idiot and they should be locked up but the What The??? is the fact that some individuals were so impressed by this behavior that there now seems to be copycats undertaking the same act.

contaminatedstrawberries

Now first of all why would you do that?  Why would you copy something which is not only jeopardizing the health of people but also jeopardizing the livelihood of strawberry producers?  The second interesting point is how do you punish these individuals when apprehended?  Do you sentence them harsher than the instigator?  Remember there is the suspicion that this is simply for attention.  Or do you just rebuke them?

I would love to know what you think.

Deb

© 2018 Deborah Whittam

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September – rhymes and realities – 23/9

23rd September 2018

Hey Diddle Diddle

 

Hey diddle diddle is a fantasy rhyme designed to delight children with impossible images such “the Cow jumped over the Moon”! Walt Disney’s team of animators use this type of imagery in animated films to great effect! The term ‘ Hey diddle diddle’ can be found in the works of Shakespeare and was a colloquialism used in much the same vein as “hey nonny no” which can be found in traditional English folk ballads. The original title was ‘High Diddle Diddle’ but this has been altered to ‘Hey Diddle Diddle’ over the years with changes to the English language. The first known date of publication for the words of the Hey diddle diddle rhyme is 1765.

Hey Diddle Diddle

Hey diddle diddle,
The Cat and the fiddle,
The Cow jumped over the moon,
The little Dog laughed to see such sport,
And the Dish ran away with the Spoon

© 2018 Deborah Whittam

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[I AM]

I am a built construct
which can’t tolerate strain
I am an opinion
with an illusionary foundation
I am a product of self
without any basis in reason
I am beyond your control
though you fight to protect me
I am a vulnerability
here one moment then gone
I am reputation
destroyed in an instant

Ten things you shouldn’t say to the bride on her wedding day

My friend Charles from Potatoes and the promise of More Potatoes is taking a wee break from posting over the next few days and because I admire his work so much I thought I would try some imitation.  (It’s the best form of flattery you know)

I expect this isn’t going to be very funny, but here we go.

brides

 

I didn’t know this was a muppets themed wedding

brides

Are you allowed to wear white?

brides

Was that you I saw sneaking out of the best man’s hotel room?

brides

Did your daddy need to use the shotgun?

brides

Were there no flights left to Las Vegas?

brides

I didn’t know tacky was the new wedding trend?

brides

Appearance isn’t that important, your wedding photos could always be used to advertise funerals

brides

Was I meant to bring a gift or a condolence card?

brides

Well perhaps he did marry you for money but at least it wasn’t for your personality?

brides

I’m sorry, I didn’t realize this was a happy occassion.

brides

© 2018 Deborah Whittam

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September – rhymes and realities – 22/9

22nd September 2018

The Grand old Duke of York Rhyme

 

The Wars of the Roses
The origin to the words of “The grand old Duke of York” are believed to date back to the Plantagenet dynasty in the 15th century and refer mockingly to the defeat of Richard, “The grand old Duke of York” in the Wars of the Roses (1455). This war was between the house of York (whose symbol was a white rose) and the house of Lancaster (whose symbol was a red rose). The Wars of the Roses lasted for over thirty years and were equivalent to a Civil War.

Origins of the Rhyme
The words of the Nursery rhyme are believed to refer to Richard, Duke of York, claimant to the English throne and Protector of England and the Battle of Wakefield on December 30, 1460. The Duke of York and his army marched to his castle at Sandal where Richard took up a defensive position against the Lancastrian army. Sandal Castle was built on top of the site of an old Norman motte and bailey fortress. Its massive earthworks stood 33 feet (10m) above the original ground level (“he marched them up to the top of the hill”). In a moment of madness he left his stronghold in the castle and went down to make a direct attack on the Lancastrians ” he marched them down again”. His army was overwhelmed and Richard the Duke of York was killed. A similar Nursery rhyme is The King of France went up the hill.

The Grand Old Duke Of York

Oh, The grand old Duke of York,
He had ten thousand men;
He marched them up to the top of the hill,
And he marched them down again.
And when they were up, they were up,
And when they were down, they were down,
And when they were only half-way up,
They were neither up nor down

© 2018 Deborah Whittam

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